Jens Schröter, Jesus of Nazareth – Jew from Galilee, Savior of the World

Published 2014

Translated by Wayne Coppins and S. Brian Pounds

For the Baylor University Press page, see here.

For the German version, see here.

For Jens Schröter’s English-Language Publications, see here.

For Jens Schröter’s “German Scholars” post, see here.

For Jens Schröter’s University webpage, see here.

Pre-Publication Reviews

Chris Keith: “Jens Schröter is one of the most important and innovative Jesus scholars in the world. Building from detailed knowledge of the literary and archaeological remains of Jesus’ first-century contexts and a sophisticated understanding of the work of the historian, Jesus of Nazareth weaves a narrative that begins with the historical Jesus and his renewal movement for all Israel and ends with modern artistic depictions of Jesus. Students, lay readers, and scholars will all benefit greatly from this important work.”

Gerd Theissen: “Jens Schröter has written an excellen tbook about the historical Jesus. It not only avoids a radical skepticism, but also makes clear why both positions can be derived from our sources. It is sensitive for our modern tastes and prejudices, but rejects the idea that historians shape their image of the historical Jesus merely by their own values. Although historical Jesus research depends on our changing knowledge of the historical context of Jesus and our modern mentality, Schröter defends both the legitimacy of a theological access to Jesus and of historical Jesus research. Jesus of Nazareth is a very balanced book”.

Gregory E. Sterling: “The three scholarly movements that we call the quests for the historical Jesus have all distinguished between the Jesus of history and the Jesus of faith by emphasizing the discontinuities between the two. Jens Schröter challenges this basic divide by pointing to continuities, not by a naïve understanding of historical criticism but by exploring how interpretations of the significance of Jesus arose in continuity with the historical Jesus. This is the most important statement in contemporary scholarship between the Jesus who was and the Jesus who is.”

Reviews

Paul T. Vogel: “As informed and informative as it is thoughtful and thought-provoking, Jesus of Nazareth: Jew from Galilee, Savior of the World is highly recommended for community and academic library collections, as well as non-specialist general readers with an interest in a scholarly approach to the life and legacy of Jesus regardless of their denominational affiliation.” (Midwest Book Review)

Don Schweitzer: “this insightful, informative, well-written book carries forward the quest for the historical Jesus. It is suitable for clergy, educated lay people, and New Testament scholars. Everyone interested in what can be known historically about Jesus should read it.” (Touchstone February 2016, 62-64: review is generally positive with some criticism relating to Schröter’s treatment of how the Easter faith arose).

Nathan J. McKanna with Joseph D. Fantin: “For scholars engaged in historical Jesus studies, Schröter has provided an intriguing approach. It attempts to adequately consider both historical findings and the interpretive picture of Jesus that has emerged throughout the generations since his earthly ministry.” (Biblical Sacra 2105 [October-December]: 495-497: review is critical in other respects)

Blog and other Online Responses

Chris Keith (Oct 10, 2014): Jens Schröter’s Jesus of Nazareth

Clifford Kvidahl (October 25, 2014): Some thoughts on @ Baylor Press “Jesus of Nazareth: Jew from Galilee, Savior of the World”

Russell E. Saltzman (September 3, 2015): Meeting the Real Jesus

For Wayne Coppins blog posts on this volume, see here.

Reviews of the German version

Not yet added here

One thought on “Jens Schröter, Jesus of Nazareth – Jew from Galilee, Savior of the World

  1. Pingback: Wayne Coppins on translating German and the Baylor-Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity: Author Interview | Dunelm Road

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